Lochaber, where the waters meet

Lochaber

Glengarry stags in winter

Glengarry stags in winter

With the historic garrison town of Fort William at it’s heart, Lochaber encompasses many of Scotland’s most iconic features. The south-east approach is guarded by the Buachaille Etive Mhor or great shepherd of Etive at the entrance to Glencoe. Follow the 82 past Loch Leven and you arrive at Corran ferry, the gateway to Ardnamurchan. The peninsula is a haven for all manner of wildlife and recently declared a sanctuary for the critically endangered Scottish wildcat.

Loch Quoich sunset

Loch Quoich sunset

Carry on past Corran ferry and through Fort William, where you will find Ben Nevis, the UK’s tallest mountain. “The Ben” overlooks the Great Glen, a fault line that cuts Scotland from coast to coast and marks the boundary where two great continents collided hundreds of millions of years ago. This Geological event created a natural route for the Caledonian Canal. From Arisaig take a ferry to the small isles of Rhum, Eigg, Muick and Canna, a sunken volcanic caldera. Another ferry from the fishing port of Mallaig will take you to the Knoydart peninsula, the last true wilderness area in Europe.

The small isles from Traigh, near Arisaig

The small isles from Traigh, near Arisaig

This wild and beautiful land is the true domain of our native wild species. Red deer and golden eagles roam and soar freely across the hills. The coastal regions are playgrounds for healthy populations of otters and seals, not to mention myriad seabirds and other species. And the summer seas see migrating whales, dolphins and basking shark.

Overall, there is nowhere in the UK better to enjoy our wild creatures and wild places and a Wild West safari can make sure that you experience all of this.

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